Students collect, organize, describe, and analyze data

Overview

After completing a game-like simulation to determine a career and salary, student groups will collect information and decide what is the “best” city in which to live. Students will individually choose a “best” city, support their decision, and create a monthly budget for their “best” city based on the salary from the simulation.

Concepts

  • Students collect, organize, describe, and analyze data.

  • Students enter data on Claris Works spreadsheet.

  • Students use their spreadsheet to display results as a circle graph.

  • Students present their results verbally and with a poster.

  • Students analyze data and use communicate results in a written document.



Indicators

  • Students collect data.

  • Students display data.

  • Students analyze data and communicate results in a written document.


Precomputer

  • Students will use the game-like simulation, “Odds On You: Could This Be Your Life?” Activity from the Lawrence Hall of Science to determine the classifications of their life such as ethnicity, gender, high school electives, post-secondary education, career choice, and salary. This is optional, but highly recommended. Alternatively, students could simply be assigned a salary randomly by the teacher.

  • Students will research the type of monthly living expenses for a family of four.

  • In groups of two or three, students will choose one city from each of the four time zone regions of the United States. Using the Internet and other resource materials, students will use Activity Sheet #1 to collect data on each of their four cities.

  • Using the information they collected on each of their four cities, students will create two line plots. The temperature line plot will compare the average monthly temperature for each of their cities, and the precipitation line plot will compare the average monthly precipitation for each of their cities.

  • Using the information they collected on each of their four cities, students will create a picture graph comparing the median price of a 3-bedroom house.

  • Using the information they collected on each of their four cities, students will create a bar graph comparing the unemployment rates and a histogram of per capita incomes.

  • Using the information they collected on each of their four cities, students will create a bar graph comparing the crime rates.

  • Students will use their graphs and other information to determine the “best” city in which to live, and to create a poster on it.

  • Each group will present the information they collected on their “best” city to the class.

  • Based on classroom presentations, each student will choose a “best” city, and write a one page paper using statistics and other information to justify their choice.

  • Students will use the Internet (optional) and other related resource materials to create a monthly budget based on the salary from the “Odds On You: Could This Be Your Life?” Activity. The budget should mirror the cost of living in their individual choice of a “best” city.



On the computer

  • Students will put their monthly budget into a Claris Works spreadsheet. They will use the spreadsheet to find the annual amount spent in each category and the each category’s percent of their annual income.

  • From this spreadsheet, students will create a circle graph of their budget categories.


Postcomputer

  • In class discusstion, students will compare and contrast their budget circle graphs.


Related resources

  • “Odds On You: Could This Be Your Life?”, Lawrence Hall of Science, Berkeley, CA.